Gender Pay Gap: Women in UK still far adrift on salary and promotion as gender pay gap remains a gulf

The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) has found that women earn 18% less than men on average, according to new research, highlighting the widening gender pay gap in the UK.

The current 18% gap in hourly wages is down from 23% in 2003 and 28% in 1993, according to the IFS research.

The current 18% gap in hourly wages is down from 23% in 2003 and 28% in 1993, according to the IFS research. Photograph: Luke MacGregor/Reuters.

The gap is said to increase after women have children, raising the prospect that mothers are missing out on pay rises and promotions – which is echoed by a separate report suggesting that male managers are 40% more likely than female managers to be promoted.

The pay gap widens consistently for 12 years after a first child is born, by which point women receive 33% less pay an hour than men, according to the research funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

The pay gap widens for 12 years after the birth of a first child

Here at the People Development Team we are committed to closing the gender pay gap by helping to progress talented women. Our dynamic Accelerate programme addresses women at all levels in the pipeline, from senior & middle managers, through first line managers, to graduates and juniors starting out. So, whether you’re looking for impact & influence for those starting out, career management for first line managers, or authentic leadership with vulnerability for those at a senior level, we can support your needs.

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